DCIG

NVMe Unleashing Performance and Storage System Innovation

Mainstream enterprise storage vendors are embracing NVMe. HPE, NetApp, Pure Storage, Dell EMC, Kaminario and Tegile all offer all-NVMe arrays. According to these vendors, the products will soon support storage class memory as well. NVMe protocol access to flash memory SSDs is a big deal. Support for storage class memory may become an even bigger deal.

Two Insights into Why Enterprises are Finally Embracing Public Cloud Computing

In between my travels, doing research, and taking some time off in May, I also spent time getting up to speed on Amazon Web Services by studying for the AWS Certified Solutions Architect Associated exam in anticipation of DCIG doing more public cloud-focused competitive research. While I know it is no secret that cloud adoption has taken off in recent years, what has puzzled me during this time is, “Why is it now that have enterprises finally started to embrace public clouds?”

Six Best Practices for Implementing All-flash Arrays

Almost any article published today related to enterprise data storage will talk about the benefits of flash memory. However, while many organizations now use flash in their enterprise, most are only now starting to use it at a scale where they use it to host more than a handful of their applications. As organizations look to deploy flash more broadly in their enterprises, here are six best practices to keep in mind as they do so.

Seven Significant Trends in the All-Flash Array Marketplace

Much has changed since DCIG published the DCIG 2017-18 All-Flash Array Buyer’s Guide just one year ago. The DCIG analyst team is in the final stages of preparing a fresh snapshot of the all-flash array (AFA) marketplace. As we reflected on the fresh all-flash array data and compared it to the data we collected just a year ago, we observed seven significant trends in the all-flash array marketplace that will influence buying decisions through 2019.

HYCU Branches Out to Tackle ESX Backups in non-Nutanix Shops

A virtualization focused backup software play may be perceived as “too little, too late” with so many players in today’s backup space. However, many former virtualization centric backup software plays (PHD Virtual and vRanger come to mind) have largely disappeared while others got pricier and/or no longer do just VM backups. These changes have once again created a need for a virtualization centric backup software solution. This plays right into the hands of the newly created HYCU as it formally tackles the job of ESX virtual machine (VM) backups in non-Nutanix shops.

Predictive Analytics in Enterprise Storage: More Than Just Highfalutin Mumbo Jumbo

Enterprise storage startups are pushing the storage industry forward faster and in directions it may never have gone without them. It is because of these startups that flash memory is now the preferred place to store critical enterprise data. Startups also advanced the customer-friendly all-inclusive approach to software licensing, evergreen hardware refreshes, and pay-as-you-grow utility pricing. These startup-inspired changes delight customers, who are rewarding these startups with large follow-on purchases and Net Promoter Scores (NPS) previously unseen in this industry. Yet the greatest contribution startups may make to the enterprise storage industry is applying predictive analytics to storage.

Glitch is the Next Milestone in Recoveries

No business – and I mean no business – regardless of its size ever wants to experience an outage for any reason or duration. However, to completely avoid outages means spending money and, in most cases, a lot of money. That is why, when someone shared with me earlier this week, that one of their clients has put in place a solution that keeps their period of downtime to what appears as a ‘glitch’ to their end-users for nominal cost, it struck a chord with me.

All-inclusive Licensing is All the Rage in All-flash Arrays

Early in my IT career, a friend who owns a software company told me he had been informed by a peer that he wasn’t charging enough for his software. This peer advised him to adopt a “flinch-based” approach to pricing. He said my friend should start with a base licensing cost that meets margin requirements, and then keep adding on other costs until the prospective customer flinches. My friend found that approach offensive, and so do I.